Create a Happy List

One of the fastest, most powerful tricks I use in order to manage my energy and maintain a good mood is to use my happy list.

It sounds silly, but honestly I think this is one of the real secrets of being able to increase happiness and raise your energy on command.

The key is simply to know what makes you happy, and what doesn’t. Then, prioritize the activities that bring you joy. If you do this frequently, you’ll find you quickly begin to love your life. It really is that simple.

Here’s how to do it.

What Is A Happy List?

Firstly, let me be clear about exactly what I’m talking about when I say you should create a happy list.

It’s not rocket science. It’s exactly what it sounds like.

A happy list is a list of things that you can count on to make you happy. These can be absolutely anything, but should be unique to you. 

For example, your happy list might include:

  • Walking the dog
  • Listening to music
  • Reading a book
  • Cooking
  • Taking a nap
  • Going for a drive
  • Meditating
  • Dancing to the radio
  • Going out for coffee
  • Looking at a flower
  • Calling a friend
  • Smiling

These are just a few examples. Try to come up with your list of at least 10-15 activities. Ideally, try to expand your list to 20-30 things you can do.

Then, whenever you’re in a bad mood, choose an activity from your list. Happiness guaranteed.

Why You Should Create Your Own Happy List

If you’re going to get serious about stopping negative thoughts and radically leveling up the joy and passion you feel in your life, you need to prioritize happiness.

This means you need to start training yourself to pay attention to your mood, and take the necessary steps to reverse a bad mood when it sets in.

Your happy list can become an essential tool to help you do this.

This technique will work best if you diversify your list, and include different types of activities for different scenarios. For example, you might group your list into activities that take less than 5 minutes, activities that take 10-15 minutes, and activities that take a half hour or more.

Alternatively, you could think about things you can do in different scenarios. What you do to boost your mood at work will probably be different than what you would do at home by yourself, or when you’re with friends or family.

Don’t Overthink It

As you’re creating this list, remember that the easier an activity is to do, the more likely you are to do it.

You can think of literally anything that makes you happy. It could be something as simple as smiling, or giving someone a compliment. 

No one else has to approve of your list, and it doesn’t have to be anything that’s going to get you a reward at work or help you win the Nobel Peace Prize.

The list just a bunch of things that make you happy. Easy, right?

For more tips and techniques, check out our empowerment training, or click here to learn how to cultivate joy in your life.

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